Carré 35 (A1).jpg

Carré 35

Regie: Eric Caravaca

FR/DE 2017, 67 min., Farbe, OmU, FSK: tbc

Der Dokumentarfilmer Eric Caravaca macht sich auf die Spuren seiner mit drei Jahren verstorbenen großen Schwester. Seltsamerweise erzählte seine Familie so gut wie gar nichts über sie und selbst die Eltern haben nicht ein einziges Foto von ihr aufbewahrt. Auf den Spuren eines geheimnisvollen vergessenen Lebens, öffnet er geheime Türen und lässt uns an einer leidenschaftlichen und zu tiefst menschlichen Suche teilhaben. 

Carré 35 (A1).jpg

Carré 35

Regie: Eric Caravaca

FR/DE 2017, 67 min., Farbe, OmU, FSK: tbc

Der Dokumentarfilmer Eric Caravaca macht sich auf die Spuren seiner mit drei Jahren verstorbenen großen Schwester. Seltsamerweise erzählte seine Familie so gut wie gar nichts über sie und selbst die Eltern haben nicht ein einziges Foto von ihr aufbewahrt. Auf den Spuren eines geheimnisvollen vergessenen Lebens, öffnet er geheime Türen und lässt uns an einer leidenschaftlichen und zu tiefst menschlichen Suche teilhaben. 

Inhalt

Inhalt

Der Dokumentarfilmer Eric Caravaca macht sich auf die Spuren seiner mit drei Jahren verstorbenen großen Schwester. Seltsamerweise erzählte seine Familie so gut wie gar nichts über sie und selbst die Eltern haben nicht ein einziges Foto von ihr aufbewahrt. Auf den Spuren eines geheimnisvollen vergessenen Lebens, öffnet er geheime Türen und lässt uns an einer leidenschaftlichen und zu tiefst menschlichen Suche teilhaben. 

 

Credits

Stabliste

Regie: Eric Caravaca

Drehbuch: Éric Caravaca, Arnaud Cathrine

Kamera: Jerzy Palacz

Schnitt: Simon Jacquet

Musik: Florent Marchet

Ton: Guillaume Sciama, Antoine-Basile Mercier, Frédéric Messa

Produzent: Laetitia Gonzalez, Yaël Fogiel

Koproduzent: Nicole Gerhards

Produktion: Les Films du Poisson

Koproduktion: NiKo Film

 

Pressestimmen

Pressestimmen

 

Cannes Film Review: ‘Plot 35’

Small is rather beautiful, and also deceptively deep, in Eric Caravaca’s family-history documentary “Plot 35.” Across its slender 65-minute running time it packs the emotional resonance of many a longer feature, if only because, as much as it does describe an arc of change (by its close, there is a photograph on a gravestone where previously there was a gaping absence), it also understands that not all questions have satisfactory answers, and no matter how directly we confront our loved ones, they are their own people, and their secrets belong to them. “Plot 35” doesn’t just explore a family tragedy — it explores the tragedy of family, the way that loving our parents is not the same as understanding them, just as for them, loving their children does not always mean telling them the truth.

It’s noteworthy that Caravaca is an established French actor (he also heads up Philippe Garrel’s Cannes Directors’ Fortnight title “Lover for a Day”), as the film’s closest analog is probably the wonderful “Stories We Tell,” by Canadian actor-director Sarah Polley. Perhaps there is something in an actor’s nature that gives the exploration of family secrets such a keen edge. But Caravaca’s film could just as well have been titled “Stories We Don’t Tell”: The “plot” of the title is in a graveyard in Casablanca where he believes his sister, Christine, who died as a child, is buried, but he is fascinated not so much by the story of her short life as by the systematic erasure of it from their family history by his parents. Caravaca, who is present in the solemn, sonorous voiceover and as the offscreen interlocutor in interviews with family members, sets out to investigate why Christine’s death was the source of so much shame and obfuscation.

Almost immediately, he runs into dark revelations and blank contradictions, some of which are red herrings, some of which point to sinister undercurrents: There is no plot number 35 in the graveyard; his mother claims that Christine lived to three years of age, while his father, who dies during the process of the film’s creation, claims it was only four months, and travel documents imply that neither parent was present when the girl died. Not all of these contradictions are, or ever will be, fully reconciled.

In the course of his investigation he weaves in allusions to Algerian, Moroccan and French colonial history, comparing the deliberate national policy of forgetfulness that followed the Algerian war of independence to the abrogation of Christine’s memory, though never bombastically so. He also displays a cinephile’s faith in the filmed and photographed image: There is no Christine in large part because there are no pictures of her and no 8mm home video footage of her. All of it was burned by his mother, whose explanation for this extreme course of action, “What should I do, cry over it?” is, like many of her replies, no real explanation at all.

This “pics or it didn’t happen” attitude, like many of the more tenuous connections between the intimate and the epic here, is only obliquely spelled out. Caravaca’s impulse is always toward the associative, the impressionist and the poetic rather than the literal. But it is present in his obsessive examination of his parents’ home movies as well as in shocking newsreel footage of atrocities during the Algerian war of independence and in grotesque images from Nazi propaganda movies extolling the “moral duty” that is euthanizing the handicapped. By resurrecting this footage — of his parents when young, happy and carefree, of mutilated anonymous soldiers dying in the muck and of physically deformed and otherwise afflicted, doomed children — Caravaca, like the cinema archive he visits at one point, is restoring these neglected images, as if in so doing he can save all the people they portray from the flames of history too. The evocative, intimate “Plot 35” is a tiny but valuable act of unforgetting.

- The Variety

Biografie

Biografie

Eric Caravaca

A former student of the prestigious National School of the Arts and Techniques of Theatre (la Rue Blanche) and of the French National Academy of Dramatic Arts (le Conservatoire National) in Paris, he has performed on stage in productions by Philippe Adrien, Alain Françon or Thomas Ostermeier.

He made his film debut in Diane Bertrand’s A Saturday on Earth (Cannes, Un Certain Regard, 1996). In 2000, he was awarded the César for Most Promising Actor for his performance in François Dupeyron’s C’est quoi la vie?. He worked again with Dupeyron for his films The Officers’ Ward (César nomination for Best Actor in 2002) and Inguelezi (2004).

A favourite of art house film directors, he works with Jean-Pierre Limosin, Siegrid Alnoy, Werner Schroeter and in 2003 he stars in Patrice Chéreau’s His Brother.
He then directed his first film The Passenger, which was presented at the Venice Film Festival Critics’ Week in 2005, won the Jury Grand Prize and the Audience Award at Belfort Film Festival and Best Director Award at Ourense Film Festival. After starring in two socially conscious films in 2006, Lucas Belvaux’s The Right of the Weakest and Laurent Herbiet’s The Colonel, he moved on to a lighter tone in Catherine Corsini’s Ambitious, Jérôme Bonnell’s Waiting for Someone and Josiane Balasko’s A French Gigolo.

After that, he shoots with Costa-Gavras, Cédric Anger, Julie Lopes Curval and returns to more tragic performances in Jean-Pierre Denis’ Here Below (2012), Alexandre Arcady’s 24 Days (2014) and Pol Cruchten’s Die Räuber (2015). Lately he has worked with Matthieu Delaporte, Antoine Cuypers, and stars in Philippe Garrel’s Lover for a day, selected at the 2017’s Directors’ Fortnight.

As a screenwriter, he has written his own films and collaborated on a script based on Arnaud Cathrine’s novel Je ne retrouve personne, for the French television network Arte.

Besides, Eric Caravaca has been exploring photography for many years and his work is exhibited and published.

 

Interview

Interview

Text einfügen

 

Festivals

Festivals und Preise

Preise

- Festival Imagesanté, Belgium (Second Prize and Prix de la Province de Liège)

- Festival d'Annaba du Film Méditerranéen, Algeria (Annab d'Or for Best Documentary)

- FIFF Tübingen, Stuttgart (Bester Film)

- Festival Intl du film Francophone de Namur (Audience Award for best documentary)

 

2018

- Institut Français du Maroc, Special screenings

- Istanbul International film Festival

- Ecrans du Réel, Beyrouth

 

2017

- Festival International du Film Francophone de Namur

- Athens International Film Festival

- El Gouna Film Festival

- Fête du Cinéma Français au Portugal

- Mostra Internacional de Cinema Sao Paulo

- Cinemania, Francophone Film Festival in Montréal

- Cairo European Film Festival

- DOC NYC

- IDFA - International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam

- 17ème Festival Cinéma Méditerranéen de Bruxelles

- 35. Filmfest München

- 70. Festival de Cannes, Special Screenings (Weltpremiere)

 

Downloads

Downloads

Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (Carré 35 (A1).jpg)Carré 35 Poster 23135 kB
Download this file (Carré 35 captures 1.png)Carré 35 Still 4 1687 kB
Download this file (Carré 35 captures 39.png)Carré 35 Still 3 1775 kB
Download this file (Carré 35 jpg.jpg)Carré 35 Still 2 676 kB
Download this file (Mère enfant maillot.png)Carré 35 Still 1 3211 kB

Jetzt im Kino!!

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PREVIEWS / FESTIVALS / PREMIERE / FILMGESPRÄCHE

am 19.11.2018 WIESBADEN - exground Filmfest

 

 

Kinostart: 31.01.2019

 

BERLIN

31.01. - 06.02.2019 fsk-Kino

 

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NÜRNBERG

31.01. - 13.02.2019 Filmhaus